Porsche’s Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo Is A Heck Of A Hybrid



Overall, my time with the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo left me deeply impressed. It looks great inside and out, it's extremely practical, and eats miles with aplomb.

We'll have to wait a while for better battery tech before we get a plug-in hybrid EV (PHEV) 911, Boxster, or Cayman, but Porsche's Panamera and Cayenne range are available now with a side helping of lithium-ion. The first PHEV Porsche appeared in 2014 in the second-generation Cayenne. It impressed us when we tested it last year, beating less powerful plug-in SUVs from BMW and Volvo when it came to fuel economy and driving fun. But the boffins in Stuttgart have been tinkering with their PHEV tech, adding more kWh, horsepower, torque, and generally refining all the software and control electronics that make everything work. They've done a fine job, if our time testing the $104,000 Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo is anything to go by. Porsche invented the hybrid? When you think Porsche, you probably picture a 911, the rear-engined sports car now in its 55th year of production. Or maybe the name calls to mind Steve McQueen racing down the Mulsanne Straight in a blue-and-orange blur. But did you also know the company invented the hybrid automobile back in 1900? The Lohner-Porsche Mixed Hybrid—also known as "Semper Vivus"—was one of Ferdinand Porsche's first creations, using a pair of single-cylinder engines coupled to 2.5kW generators that fed power into a massive battery pack. The technology didn't catch on at the time, but fast forward more than a century and today the company is still a leader in hybrid technology. In 2010, it launched the Cayenne S Hybrid, which added some nickel-metal hydride batteries to the big off-roader. That same year, it experimented with a mechanical flywheel as an energy store in the 911 GT3 R race car, technology that then went on to be used by Audi's diesel-powered Le Mans racers. When it was time for Porsche itself to return to Le Mans with the 919 Hybrid, the company went a more conventional route, combining a turbocharged V4 gasoline engine with two hybrid systems powered by an array of lithium-ion cells. A similar approach was used for its 918 Spyder, which featured a V8 engine derived from the RS Spyder race car, 6.8kWh of lithium-ion storage, and a price tag that wouldn't leave a lot of change from a million bucks. As is the way in the automotive world, that technology has been trickling down to Porsche's mass-production range. The current 911 and 718 sports cars feature a lot of the same engine technology as the 919 Hybrid's internal combustion engine, for instance. For now, Porsche is holding back from hybridizing its sports cars, citing weight and size as a reason to hold off for the promise of solid state batteries. But it has no such reticence when it comes to adding some juice to its four-door range. The third-generation Cayenne SUV has a PHEV variant coming—some of our friends at other publications were off driving it in Germany last week, in fact, but it's yet to go on sale here in the US. For now, you can buy several different PHEV Panameras, depending on whether you want the regular sedan version or the Sport Turismo body style we tested here. There's also a choice of two powertrains. Over in Europe, where it went on sale in June 2017, the E-Hybrid versions now account for 60 percent of all Porsche Panamera sales. We got the model much later in the US, but, if I'm reading the sales figures right, in April it made up about a third of Panamera sales. A review of the full-fat, 680hp Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid will have to wait a few more weeks, so today we're just going to discuss the "lesser" 4 E-Hybrid. In 1900, Ferdinand Porsche created the first-ever hybrid electric car. Porsche More recently, Porsche won Le Mans three times in a row with this, the 919 Hybrid. Porsche There's not much to see if you lift the hood, just lots of plastic shrouding. Porsche The E-Hybrid system. The big box in the back is the battery pack. The electric motor lives in between the V6 and transmission. Porsche Under the skin The internal combustion side of things is courtesy of a 2.9L direct-injection twin-turbo V6. This provides the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid with 330hp (246kW) and 331ft-lbs (450Nm)—essentially the same as the non-hybrid 3.0L V6-powered Panamera 4. Between the engine and an eight-speed version of dual-clutch gearbox (Porsche Doppelkupplung, or PDK) is an electric motor rated at 136hp (100kW) and 295ft-lbs (400NM). It's worth noting that the total power and torque output for the powertrain is a little less than the sum of its parts, but 462hp (345kW) and 516ft-lbs (700Nm) is still more than adequate for a vehicle with a curb weight of 4,828lbs (2,190kg). The electric motor is a development of the one in the older Cayenne hybrid we tested, and the older system's electro-hydraulic internal combustion engine decoupler has been replaced by an electromechanical system that provides shorter response times. As you might expect, the E-Hybrid uses liquid-cooled lithium-ion batteries, located behind the rear seats and underneath the floor of the trunk. The pack is the same weight as in the previous generation of Panamera PHEV, but it's now 14.1kWh (versus 9.4kWh). Charging from empty to full takes 12 hours at 120V or three hours with a 240V level 2 charger if you spec the 7.2kW onboard charger (an $840 option). Porsche claims 31 miles (50km) of electric-only range, although that's based on Europe's NEDC cycle. The EPA, which seems to get much closer to real-world EV range, figures the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid at 16 miles (26km) with a combined 46mpge, or 22mpg when using gasoline alone. As the electric motor is positioned upstream of the gearbox, it will send power and torque to—and recover kinetic energy under deceleration from—all four wheels (the "4" in Panamera 4 E-Hybrid means all-wheel drive) compared to PHEVs like the BMW i8 or Volvo XC90, which use their internal combustion engines to power one axle and their electric motors to power the other. Distribution of the powertrain's power and torque to the wheels is handled by the Porsche Traction Management system, one of an array of electronic systems that control the Panamera. It sends most of it to the rear wheels by default, but the vehicle can send 100 percent of available torque to either axle if road conditions necessitate. (A torque-vectoring rear differential is also available as an option, although our test car wasn't fitted with one.) The suspension is a double-wishbone arrangement with adaptive air suspension at each corner. Our test Panamera was also equipped with rear-axle steering ($1,620), which enhances cornering stability at higher speeds by turning the rear wheels in the same direction as the front, effectively increasing the wheelbase. At low speeds, it boosts maneuverability by turning in the opposite direction to the front wheels, effectively reducing the wheelbase. All Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismos also get the Sport Chrono package as standard. This is most obvious from the stopwatch mounted atop the dashboard, but this package also gives you access to Sport Plus mode, more on which shortly.

Enlarge Elle Cayabyab Gitlin If all that wasn't enough, there's also the Sport Response button, which lives in the center of the drive mode controller. Push this and the engine and gearbox go into their raciest settings, giving you an extra burst of power for up to 20 seconds. (You can cancel it by pressing it again if you don't need all 20 seconds.) No, wait, we're not done. On top of all of those different drive modes, you can also tweak the active suspension independently of the rest of the settings, switching from Normal (the softest) through Sport to Sport Plus. So if you're in a hurry but the road surface is poor, you can set the drive mode to Sport Plus and have the powertrain set to maximum attack while still letting the suspension soak up all the bumps, or vice-versa. Performance is rapid but not blistering—for that you need the much more expensive 680hp (507kW) Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid. Zero to 60mph takes 4.4 seconds, and it tops out at 170mph (274km/h). Operate it on electric power alone and the stats are a still-respectable 5.7 seconds 0-60mph and a top speed of 87mph (140km/h). Sport Turismo practicality The Sport Turismo body style was new for the second-generation Panamera. From the B-pillar forward, it's identical to the Panamera sedan. But instead of a sloping fastback at the rear, you get an elongated roofline that finishes with a very practical hatchback. The styling is reminiscent of the stillborn Bugatti EB112, and, while looks are subjective, I think it's a winner, particularly in our test car's rather fetching Sapphire Blue Metallic paint. Spotting a hybrid Panamera is very easy—just look for the acid green highlights on the badges or the brake calipers. Where seemingly every other OEM is opting for blue accents to signify their hybrid machines, Porsche has opted for a more retina-searing method, and again I like it. The cabin is vast, thanks to the Panamera's width. Up front, you and your passenger are separated by a wide center console. The most noticeable change compared to the first-gen Panamera is an almost total absence of physical buttons on that console. Although Porsche still believes in dozens of individual controls for the climate control, seats, and suspension, now they're touch controls underneath a uniform glossy black surface. Their positions don't change, and you get haptic feedback when you press one, so building up muscle memory ought not to be a problem. The center stack is dominated by a large (12.3-inch) touchscreen for the Porsche Communication Management infotainment system. It's based on Volkswagen Group's excellent MIB II platform, and, like other VW Group systems (like the one in the current VW Golf) the screen has a proximity sensor. Interacting with it is intuitive, and the tile-based UI is highly customizable so you can set up your home screen with the information and apps you want. The rim of the multifunction steering wheel is just a tiny bit too wide for my liking. It's nice and thin though. The shift paddles are fixed behind the left and right spokes, and that circular appendage at four o'clock is how you switch drive modes. Jonathan Gitlin Where the old Panamera had a million buttons, now the controls are all flush. Jonathan Gitlin The V6 barely fired up on the traffic-filled way to Ikea. Elle Cayabyab Gitlin Topping up with some more electrons. Jonathan Gitlin There's plenty of room in the trunk, although the hybrid Sport Turismo actually has less cargo volume with the seats up than any other Panamera variant. Elle Cayabyab Gitlin The back seats got rave reviews from passengers. Jonathan Gitlin Some buttons made it through the redesign. Jonathan Gitlin This is the Sport Chrono stopwatch. Jonathan Gitlin The four outer dials in the main instrument display are actually multifunction displays. Jonathan Gitlin In the last photo, the fourth dial (from the left) was showing the torque split. Here it's showing oil, water, and voltage. Jonathan Gitlin A trip computer. Jonathan Gitlin Or how about a map? Jonathan Gitlin I'm not sure how many Panamera 4 E-Hybrid owners are going to take their cars to the track, but those who do can use the lap timer. Jonathan Gitlin A G-meter. Jonathan Gitlin This one shows energy use. Jonathan Gitlin Battery status. Jonathan Gitlin Route directions. Jonathan Gitlin How many miles of electric range are left. Jonathan Gitlin If you're using InnoDrive, the green icon displays here. Jonathan Gitlin Digital screens have also replaced most of the traditional analog dials that used to live in your average Porsche instrument binnacle. The center-mounted tachometer is still an old-fashioned physical affair, but on either side of it is now a pair of multifunction displays, each controlled by a scroll wheel and buttons on the steering wheel. As you'll see in the gallery, there's an awful lot of different data you can display on these, including all the different drive modes, a navigation screen, separate navigation directions (both additional to displaying navigation on the PCM screen), and even a lap timer or G-Force meter. Open the rear doors to find two full seats and acres of rear leg room. There's technically room for a third passenger to sit between them, but with the large transmission tunnel and the cubbies, cup holders, and air vents that live atop it, it's probably best for emergencies. Cargo space is respectable; with the rear seats up, there are 15 cubic feet (424L), which increases to 45.7 cubic feet (1,294L) with the rear seats folded flat. This is actually less cargo space than the non-hybrid Panamera sedan or Sport Turismos—those batteries do take up some room, after all—but still proved more than adequate for an Ikea run. The Panamera feels extremely well put together, although the standard black interior is a little sombre. Again, I love the acid green highlights courtesy of the big central tachometer and the Sport Chrono dial, but I feel like Porsche is missing a trick by not giving the E-Hybrid seatbelts in the same lurid shade. (I checked, and it's not even an option.) It drives like a Porsche should Although the Panamera is a big car, it shrinks around you as you drive. Despite the car's not-insignificant mass, it's eager to change direction, and even in Normal mode there's little body roll when cornering. What's more, I was surprised to find that even the stiffest Sport Plus suspension setting is actually still rather comfortable on the pothole-damaged roads around Washington, DC. Often, that setting is more suitable for the confines of a race track. When you want to go fast, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo is more than capable of delivering, but it was actually the low-speed stuff that impressed me more. My first outing in the car was a Friday afternoon visit to Ikea, a 17-mile (27km) trip, which, at that time of day, was basically bumper-to-bumper traffic. We set off with a full battery and arrived nearly an hour later with a mile or two left in reserve, having spent almost the entire time running on batteries alone. Between the silent serenity of electric propulsion and the digital driving help from InnoDrive (Porsche's name for its adaptive cruise control and traffic jam assist), it was a much less rage-inducing drive than you might otherwise imagine. Small annoyances No car is perfect, and that remains true even for this hybrid Porsche with a six-figure price tag. Two things bugged me enough to merit writing down during testing. First, there's the behavior of the steering wheel, which retracts to its closest position to the dashboard to make getting in and out easier—or at least should in theory. In practice, it would move a little up and out of the way when I turned the car off, but the full "up and back" actually happened each time I fired the Panamera up, at which point I was already ensconced in the driver's seat and not in any need of its help. Cue spending 10-15 seconds each time waiting for it to return to the driving position I specified before setting off on each drive. The other quibble was with the Panamera's Apple CarPlay integration. For reasons best known to itself, when listening to podcasts the infotainment system kept switching over to SiriusXM without me asking, a practice that became annoying enough that I gave up on using CarPlay. (Android Auto still isn't available.) But as problems go, those two are rather minor in the scheme of things.


Core Values: 2018 Jeep Wrangler Sport V-6 Manual



Overall, my time with the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo left me deeply impressed. It looks great inside and out, it's extremely practical, and eats miles with aplomb.

This story is a supplement to the feature Frozen in Time: A look at the new-school sport climbs of the Flatirons, Colorado on newsstands now in the July 2018 issue of Climbing Magazine. Subscribe here: print, digital. Four names you’ll find often in the Flatirons guidebook are Colin Lantz, Bob Horan, Dan Michael, and Paul Glover, who among the many Boulder climbers in on the Flatirons sport-climbing gold rush, had a consistent and prolific presence in the 1980s as well as put up some genre-defining sport routes that retain an aura to this day. Lantz has mostly moved on to mountain biking, but Michael and Glover and Horan still climb often—and often in the Flatirons. They are longtime Boulder, Colorado, fixtures and have been at it for decades. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Here, we’ve compiled Q&As and/or personal essays about that magical period in the Flatirons from each climber, to capture the feel of the era. It was a formative time in American climbing, when sport climbing was only a few years old, still not widely accepted, and often baffling to land managers, who were now seeing climbers up on the rock with loud rotary hammer drills when in the past climbing had been a quiet, obscure, near-invisible activity. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Thanks for watching!Visit Website Sport climbing took root in North America in 1983 in Smith Rock, where Alan Watts rappel-bolted the 5.12b pocket climb Watt’s Tots. With the blank, clean faces of Smith as a template, climbers began to look for similar features in their local areas. They also took trips to Europe, the crucible of sport climbing, where the clean, sweeping, vertical limestone of the Verdon and smooth, pocketed swells of Buoux were the gold standard. As a result, many of the earliest sport climbs in the Flatirons (and in nearby Eldo) stuck to the script, climbing blank, slabby faces and arêtes. Soon, however, with the rise of radically overhanging areas like Hueco Tanks, the Enchanted Tower, and American Fork, first ascentionists began looking for steeper rock in their own backyards, the Flatirons included. While the east faces visible from town are all slabby and moderate, the north, south, and especially western aspects of the Flatirons often overhang—the trick is finding the good, featured rock with either varnish or water hardening. The first overhanging Flatirons sport routes began to appear around 1987, and as local climbers developed an eye for this new terrain, more and more climbs in this genre appeared. Groundbreaking routes include Lantz’s massive hanging roof Chains of Love (5.12b/c; 1989; the only rock climb ever featured on the cover of TIME Magazine) in Fern Canyon; Michael’s thin, gently overhanging Slave to the Rhythm (5.13b; 1987) on the East Ironing Board; Horan’s sickly steep hueco-haul The Guardian (5.12d; 1987) in Skunk Canyon; and Glover’s bulging, pocketed Touch Monkey (5.11b; 1987) on Der Zerkle on Dinosaur Mountain. All radically steep, with big pockets, huecos, and long, powerful reaches, these and other routes showed what was possible and just how much potential was left. When the ban hit in 1989, Boulder locals were just getting started. Despite this setback, climbers carried on, and steep, new climbs began to appear in nearby unregulated areas like Clear Creek Canyon and Mickey Mouse Wall, and then eventually spread to Rifle, where activity began in earnest in 1991. In other words, the Flatirons helped pave the way for Rifle. Chew on that the next time you’re gasping in the upside-down double-kneebar rest on Super-Jumbo Pump-a-Rama-Thon, wondering just how it is we got here. Here are four interviews and essays from the climbers behind the Flatirons' hard sport climbing revolution.


Class A Soccer: Kearney Upsets Omaha Westside To Win First Boys State Title In School History



Overall, my time with the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo left me deeply impressed. It looks great inside and out, it's extremely practical, and eats miles with aplomb.

Once the medals were handed out, the trophy was hoisted, interviews had been completed and the requisite team photo was taken Tuesday night, the triumphant Kearney boys soccer team migrated to the north end of Morrison Stadium. The players and coaches were headed to the people who appreciated them the most. Parents, siblings, classmates and school officials were ready to join them in celebrating the first Class A state soccer championship — boys or girls — won by a school from outside the metropolitan Omaha and Lincoln areas. A goal in the 49th minute lifted the 18-2 Bearcats to a 1-0 victory over Omaha Westside to end what last week seemed like a Herculean effort to this first state title. Kearney had to defeat No. 4 Omaha Creighton Prep, No. 1 Omaha South and the second-ranked Warriors to earn the championship. “Earned it: That’s a perfect description of it,” Kearney coach Scott Steinbrook said. “You look at the teams we had to face to get here, you’re talking about three incredible programs. “For us to not only find a way to win all three of those games, but to get shutouts in all three, this crew just did everything the right way.” The Bearcats won despite being outshot 7-1 in the first half and 10-2 over the 80-minute match. Everyone on the roster was in elementary school the last time Kearney got this close; the Bearcats were runners-up to Millard West in 2009. Determined not to face a similar fate, the Bearcats finally broke through to score the one goal they needed shortly after the 10-minute intermission. Midfielder Christian Dakan launched a corner kick from the northeast corner to junior midfielder Carson Schwarz. Forward Hunter Novacek started the transition play, Steinbrook said. “We had a corner before that, and they didn’t mark me very tight,” Schwarz said. “So this time I was like, ‘I’m going to go get this one.’ ” Schwarz said that’s the play that was called before Dakan arced the ball to him in front of the goal. “We’ve run it a couple of times during this playoff run,” Schwarz said. “It almost worked (before), but it worked this time when it mattered.” Steinbrook said the play was called by the players on the field, and it was a set piece that he was confident they could properly execute. “We pride ourselves in set pieces,” Steinbrook said. “I’m not even sure what play the kids called there. Carson is a big, physical kid, and that was a pretty exciting moment for him.” Westside coach John Brian said all the credit goes to Kearney for taking advantage of a mistake after the 18-2 Warriors had a chance to take the lead in the first half with several good looks. “We had chances,” Brian said. “They’re a good team; they bent but they didn’t break. They’re resilient. We made a mistake, they capitalized on it. They came to play. They deserve it.” The celebration with their fans continued until stadium officials told everyone wearing blue it was time to leave. Most of the pictures had the scoreboard in the background; no one from Kearney wants to forget that image. “Anytime you do something for the first time, that’s a big statement,” Steinbrook said. “It’s about want-to, and these guys really demonstrated heart and grit tonight. That’s what ultimately led us to victory.” Kearney (18-2)....................0 1—1 Omaha Westside (18-2)........0 0—0 Goals: K, Carson Schwarz (Christian Dakan), 48:39 Sign up for daily headlines from NEPrepZone Get a daily roundup of game recaps, player features and more in your inbox. Close Kearney's Christian Dakan (3) hoists the trophy alongside his teammates including Royce Austen (23) after defeating Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Angel Avila (13) and his teammates celebrate as time expires and they defeat Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) celebrates his goal with teammates during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney's Caleb Crittenden (24) hoists the trophy after the Bearcats defeated Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) is dejected after losing to Kearney in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Players from Omaha Westside sit after receiving their runner-up medals after losing to Kearney in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) heads the ball over Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) during the first half. Omaha Westside's Samuel Mormino (7) and Marvin Ramirez (19) share their opinion with a referee after they believed Kearney's goalie Jacob Hardy (0) crossed the goal line with the ball during the second half. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Omaha Westside's Jackson Bush (20) reacts to being called for a foul against Omaha Westside during the second half. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) celebrates his goal with teammate Matt Stute (15) alongside Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) during the second half. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) heads the ball to score over Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) during the second half. Kearney's Royce Austen (23) and Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) attempt to take control of a loose ball. Omaha Westside's Marvin Ramirez (19) and Kearney's Caleb Bean (10) battle for a header during the first half. Kearney's Jacob Hardy (0) makes a save alongside Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) during the first half. South Sioux City's goalie Adan Curiel (0) hoists the trophy while surrounded his teammates after defeating Elkhorn South in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City's Leonardo Davalos (5), Galdino Guzman-Navarro (3) and Martin Zamora Pagua (9) celebrate defeating Elkhorn South after time expires in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13) soars a free kick over the heads of Elkhorn South's Maxwell Dunham (14), Evan Sturdivant (7) and Mason Ortmeier (22) for a score during the second half. South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13) and Elkhorn South's Gregory Cross (18) battle for possession of the ball during the first half. South Sioux City celebrates a goal by South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13), second from right, during the second half. South Sioux City's Martin Zamora Pagua (9) celebrates his goal during the first half of the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Elkhorn South. Elkhorn South's Michael Potach (10) battles for the ball against South Sioux City's Miguel Mar (12) during the first half. Elkhorn South's Neel Sharma (19) and South Sioux City's Giovanni Padilla (16) battle for a header during the first half. Elkhorn South's Ryan Doyle (3) takes down South Sioux City's Victor Alfaro (15) while going for the ball during the first half. Elkhorn South's Gregory Cross (18) and South Sioux City's Victor Alfaro (15) battle for a header during the first half. Elkhorn South's Brian Cross (8) buries his face in his hands after losing to South Sioux City during the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City celebrates together after defeating Elkhorn South 2-0 in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney's coach Scott Steinbrook smiles after winning the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Westside at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Westside and Kearney compete during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) dances after winning the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Westside at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Hope Rose, 16, of South Sioux City cheers on the Cardinals as they compete against Elkhorn South during the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD South Sioux City and Elkhorn South compete during the second half of the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Elkhorn South's Mason Ortmeier (22) and Michael Potach (10) are dejected after losing to South Sioux City in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Kearney's Royce Austen (23) brings the ball upfield against Omaha Westside during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) reacts to a goal by Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) who headed the ball to score in the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Kearney's Christian Dakan (3) hoists the trophy alongside his teammates including Royce Austen (23) after defeating Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Angel Avila (13) and his teammates celebrate as time expires and they defeat Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) celebrates his goal with teammates during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney's Caleb Crittenden (24) hoists the trophy after the Bearcats defeated Omaha Westside in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) is dejected after losing to Kearney in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Players from Omaha Westside sit after receiving their runner-up medals after losing to Kearney in the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) heads the ball over Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) during the first half. Omaha Westside's Samuel Mormino (7) and Marvin Ramirez (19) share their opinion with a referee after they believed Kearney's goalie Jacob Hardy (0) crossed the goal line with the ball during the second half. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. Omaha Westside's Jackson Bush (20) reacts to being called for a foul against Omaha Westside during the second half. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) celebrates his goal with teammate Matt Stute (15) alongside Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) during the second half. Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) heads the ball to score over Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) during the second half. Kearney's Royce Austen (23) and Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) attempt to take control of a loose ball. Omaha Westside's Marvin Ramirez (19) and Kearney's Caleb Bean (10) battle for a header during the first half. Kearney's Jacob Hardy (0) makes a save alongside Omaha Westside's Ethan Goldner (17) during the first half. South Sioux City's goalie Adan Curiel (0) hoists the trophy while surrounded his teammates after defeating Elkhorn South in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City's Leonardo Davalos (5), Galdino Guzman-Navarro (3) and Martin Zamora Pagua (9) celebrate defeating Elkhorn South after time expires in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13) soars a free kick over the heads of Elkhorn South's Maxwell Dunham (14), Evan Sturdivant (7) and Mason Ortmeier (22) for a score during the second half. South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13) and Elkhorn South's Gregory Cross (18) battle for possession of the ball during the first half. South Sioux City celebrates a goal by South Sioux City's Michael Virgen (13), second from right, during the second half. South Sioux City's Martin Zamora Pagua (9) celebrates his goal during the first half of the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Elkhorn South. Elkhorn South's Michael Potach (10) battles for the ball against South Sioux City's Miguel Mar (12) during the first half. Elkhorn South's Neel Sharma (19) and South Sioux City's Giovanni Padilla (16) battle for a header during the first half. Elkhorn South's Ryan Doyle (3) takes down South Sioux City's Victor Alfaro (15) while going for the ball during the first half. Elkhorn South's Gregory Cross (18) and South Sioux City's Victor Alfaro (15) battle for a header during the first half. Elkhorn South's Brian Cross (8) buries his face in his hands after losing to South Sioux City during the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. South Sioux City celebrates together after defeating Elkhorn South 2-0 in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game. Kearney's coach Scott Steinbrook smiles after winning the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Westside at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Westside and Kearney compete during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) dances after winning the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game against Westside at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Kearney defeated Westside 1-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Hope Rose, 16, of South Sioux City cheers on the Cardinals as they compete against Elkhorn South during the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD South Sioux City and Elkhorn South compete during the second half of the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Elkhorn South's Mason Ortmeier (22) and Michael Potach (10) are dejected after losing to South Sioux City in the boys Class B NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. South Sioux City defeated Elkhorn South 2-0. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Kearney's Royce Austen (23) brings the ball upfield against Omaha Westside during the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD Omaha Westside's goalie Griffin Trude (1) reacts to a goal by Kearney's Carson Schwarz (14) who headed the ball to score in the second half of the boys Class A NSAA State Soccer Championship game at Morrison Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

With the World Cup in Russia only weeks away, a number of soccer executives, players, coaches and journalists on Tuesday attended an educational course on Russian language and culture hosted in Buenos Aires by the Argentine Football Association. One of participants, Nacho Catullo, made note of a section of the course material that, translated loosely, was headlined “How to score with a Russian woman.” The passage contained a number of talking points: — “Russian girls, like any other girls, pay close attention if you are clean, you smell good and if you are well dressed. The first impression is very important for them, pay attention to your image.” — “Russian girls do not like to be seen as objects. Many men, because Russian women are beautiful, they just want to take them to bed. Maybe they want it too, but they are people who want to feel important and unique . . Do not ask stupid questions about sex. For the Russians sex is something very private and the subject is not discussed in public (Maybe you do not believe me, but I know men who do it).” — “Normally they do not like it when you monopolize the conversation. I see this problem in men who are very selfish or sometimes with men who are nervous when talking to a pretty girl. In both cases it is required that you change your attitude, but for the nervous guys, relax, it’s just a girl, nothing more.” — “Normally, Russian women pay attention to important things, but of course you will find girls who only pay attention to material things, money, if you are handsome. … Do not worry, there are many beautiful women in Russia and not all are good for you. Be selective.” After Catullo tweeted out the photos, three AFA officials removed all the notebooks from the class and returned them with those pages removed. On Wednesday, the AFA issued a rather peculiar statement in which it said the material was “erroneously printed” because of “an involuntary error.” “We regret that this mistake has overshadowed the importance of the day and the educational activity provided by AFA, expressing our most sincere apologies to those who were affected by the publications, which in no way reflects the thinking of the Argentine Football Association, nor that of its President Claudio Tapia or any of its directors,” read the statement, attributed to Alejandro Taraborelli of the AFA’s Education Department. But the course’s teacher, Russian language teacher Eduardo Pennisi, told the Argentine newspaper Clarin that he had provided the material to the AFA for approval a month ago and that the soccer federation gave it the go-ahead. The passage appears to be lifted in its entirety from a WordPress blog centered on furthering relationships between Mexicans and Russians. The blog post in question was written in May 2015. “I wonder why the AFA only focused on this?” the site’s author wrote in an “explanatory note” that seemingly was added to the top of the post after news of the AFA manual broke Tuesday. Pennisi told Clarin that he indeed took that particular section from the Internet because he thought it sounded “interesting” and that the advice also applies to Argentine women who want to meet Russian men. More from The Post World Cup rosters start to take shape Manchester City won the Premier League. The Mid-Atlantic won the TV ratings. Tim Ream and Fulham one step from promotion to Premier League Wayne Rooney, D.C. United one step closer to a deal

Ron Miller feels that he helped build about the best West York High football team possible, one of the best in the state. And he still didn’t own a chance. At least not beyond the District 3 playoffs. In 2012, Miller’s undefeated Bulldogs ran into Bishop McDevitt’s buzzsaw in the district title game, losing 21-10. McDevitt, a perennial football power, draws players from across the Harrisburg region because it’s a private or non-boundary school. But the equality issue goes beyond that, Miller said. Even if West York could have somehow beat McDevitt, it never would have survived what came next in the PIAA playoffs: Erie Cathedral Prep. The Ramblers are an even more powerful private school that draws players from across state lines. They’ll bring a 28-game win streak into next season. “You look at these schools, and it seems all their athletes are going Division I,” said Miller, who now leads the Dallastown football program. “I had teams at West York that were state championship-caliber teams … but we would have gotten killed by Erie Cathedral Prep. “It’s just not a level playing field, and it’s getting more ridiculous as the years go by. You have no chance beating those teams and that’s hard to swallow some times.” Plenty of local coaches and administrators agree, just like their counterparts throughout the state. While the issue of unfair competition between private and public schools has simmered for years, it appears ready to boil over in some places. This comes as private school teams have won nearly 70 percent of Pennsylvania’s boys and girls state titles over the past three years. In boys’ basketball, private or charter schools won nine of the past 12 state titles, and many of them in a breeze. A recent survey conducted by District 7’s Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League (WPIAL) revealed that 86 percent of coaches there want to divide the playoff system for public (boundary) and private (non-boundary) teams. Results of a similar survey in the Erie-based District 10 were released this week: Of 365 public school respondents (coaches and administrators), 354 said they believe non-boundary schools own a competitive advantage; 338 were in favor of separate tournaments. Coaches and administrators in the YAIAA say the public/private disparity becomes a significant issue during district and state playoffs — particularly against teams in and around Philadelphia. Most polled in York and Adams counties are in favor of separate playoffs, as well. Meanwhile, the state’s governing body of high school sports, the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA), says their hands are tied on the playoff issue. Legislation brought the public and private schools together in 1972, meaning new legislation is needed to tear them apart.